“What say you to a piece of beef and mustard”

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Ten Shakespearian lines with which to open (or disband) a dinner party

 

“How say you to a fat tripe finely broiled?”

(The Taming of the Shrew)

*

“Uncover, dogs, and lap”

(Timon of Athens)

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“Sit down and feed, and welcome to our table”

(As You Like It)

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“Each man to his stool, with that spur as would to the lip of his mistress”

(Timon of Athens)

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“Marry, he must have a long spoon that must eat with the devil”

(The Comedy of Errors)

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“Come, we have a hot venison pasty to dinner”

(The Merry Wives of Windsor)

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“Go, I charge thee, invite them all; let in the tide of knaves once more; my cook and I’ll provide”

(Timon of Athens)

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“Although the cheer be poor,

‘T’will feed your stomachs. Please you, eat it”

(Titus Andronicus)

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“He hath eaten me out of house and home; he hath put all of my substance into that fat belly of his”

(Henry IV, pt.II)

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[revealing the heads] “Why, there they are, both baked in this pie

Whereof their mother daintily fed,

Eating the flesh that she herself hath bred”

(Titus Andronicus)

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Author:Nick Walton

Nick Walton is a Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.
  • “Uncover, dogs, and lap!” My mum used to say stuff like that to me and my brothers growing up. Dogs, monkeys, gremlins, woodland creatures… pretty much any old beast would do when attempting to describe our table manners

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