Tag Archives: University of Birmingham
Professor Ewan Fernie, University of Birmingham

Freedom, Freetown and Fernie’s Fiery Feast

You do not expect a critic of Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard and other geniuses of human depth and intellect to be as good as Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky or Kierkegaard. Fair enough. But not when the critic’s name is Ewan Fernie. I had never before heard the author of what I consider to be one of […]

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Photo: commonswikimedia

Sonnet for Advent 16: Sonnet 106

On re-reading this exquisitely musical poem just now it made me think most of The Winter’s Tale and of King Leontes staring in wonder at the statue of his supposedly dead wife, Queen Hermione, who then comes to life before his eyes. He is almost dumbstruck as distant memories co-mingle with present guilt and grief […]

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Photo: flickriver.com

Sonnet for Advent 15: Sonnet 97

This is the first of a pair of sonnets in which the beloved’s absence is compared to the seasons. Shakespeare here evokes winter, summer, autumn, summer and winter, and in that order – as though longing for the beloved disrupts a natural sequence of time. Autumn is ‘teeming’ with fruit which, because of the beloved’s […]

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The Shakespeare Institute

Shakespeare is not dead

When the amazing news, covered on this blog, came through that the remains of Richard III had been found in a Leicester car park, I shouted it upstairs to my daughter before driving off to work.  She thought King Richard had been found alive.  I instantly imagined him in a fluorescent jacket, working for NCP, […]

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Redcrosse

A New St George!

You might remember my previous blog of some weeks ago when I looked forward to the performance of a new poetic liturgy for England and St George. Well, on the evening of Saturday the 17th of November, The Royal Shakespeare Company performed Redcrosse in magnificent Coventry Cathedral for the Cathedral’s 50th birthday. I wrote Redcrosse […]

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Sir Kenneth Branagh as Henry V in his 1988 film version.

Filming Shakespeare – Gone Live!

Our recent webinar on ‘Filming Shakespeare’ has now been posted as a resource within Blogging Shakespeare and can be accessed via to tool-bar at the top of this page, or by clicking here. It’s a conversation about the Shakespeare films of Sir Kenneth Branagh, patron of The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust’s Shakespeare Film Festival. Don’t miss […]

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Martin Wiggins's new book from Oxford University Press

Robin Hood and Volatile Drama

I was pleased to welcome a former teacher of mine, Dr Martin Wiggins, to the Shakespeare Centre recently. He spoke about his new book, Drama and the Transfer of Power in Renaissance England. It’s an ingenious account of how drama was used at moments of regime change. The fruits of Martin’s characteristically deep research are […]

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Photo: Ellie Kurttz

Year of Shakespeare: Henry VIII (All is True)

Directed by Ernesto Arias for Fundación Siglo de Oro (Spain) for Shakespeare’s Globe, London. The Globe to Globe festival made a notoriously misinformed claim in its subtitle: ‘37 plays, 37 languages.’ Three Spanish-speaking companies were invited to take part in the festival, and were duly advertised as performing in ‘Argentine’, ‘Mexican’, and ‘Castilian’ Spanish: three […]

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Redcrosse

England and St George!

On the evening of the 17th of November this year, the RSC will perform Redcrosse in Coventry Cathedral. Partly an original arts event, partly a groundbreaking religious service, Redcrosse evolves out of a project I led to evolve a new questing liturgy for England and St George. It was inspired by one of the great […]

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