Tag Archives: shakespeare birthplace trust
SR OS 40/1939-40. Fine Print Collection 83300805ii. The Comedies, Histories Tragedies of William Shakespeare. New York, Limited Editions Club, 1939. Edited by Herbert Farjeon from the text of the first folio and quarto editions. It was designed by Bruce Rogers and printed at the Press of A. Colish, New York. The illustrations are hand-coloured wood-engravings by Enric-C Ricart of  Spain. No. 559 of 1950 copies.                                              p.32 opposite, Act 2 Scene 2. Cleopatra's Barge.                   Dimensions (H, W): Binding 330 x 225mm, Page 325 x 215mm, Wood Block illustration 230 x 140mm.

Illustrating Shakespeare: A History of Roman Representations in Printed Texts

By Ella Hawkins, SBT Research Advocate Ella Hawkins is currently completing a Midlands3Cities-funded placement with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust as part of her PhD studies in design for Shakespeare. In the coming weeks, Ella will be publishing a series of blog posts about the representation of Shakespeare’s Roman plays across the SBT’s Library, Archive, and Museum […]

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Charlecote Park event, 7th September

Charlecote Park Wednesday, 7th September, 5.30-7.30 pm, Charlecote Park opens its doors to Shakespeare and hosts an evening with the playwright in Warwickshire. The house, completed by Thomas Lucy in 1558, the year Elizabeth I ascended the throne, was one of the first great country houses in Warwickshire and the focus of the poaching scandal […]

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Plate 14 and Cover smaller

Shakespeare’s New Place: A one-day conference

Shakespeare’s New Place: A one-day conference Saturday 17 September, 10.00am to 4.00pm (The Wolfson Hall, The Shakespeare Centre, arrivals from 9.45am). In March 2010, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust started to lift the turf on the site of Shakespeare’s family home. New Place had been a present-absence on the corner of Chapel Street and Chapel Lane, […]

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Published 23 April 2015

Why Shakespeare Still Matters

Shakespeare has mattered ever since his name first appeared in print in 1593 with his erotic and entertaining poem, Venus and Adonis. He was 29 years old. For much of the poem the goddess of love is naked and begging for sex before Adonis, but he resists her advances. Venus and Adonis was a sensation […]

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Martin Droeshout's 1623 engraving of Shakespeare

Louis Marder Shakespeare Centre Scholarship 2015

Are you studying Shakespeare at college, university, or for leisure? Are you going to be using the archives or library of The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust? You might be interested in applying for the Louis Marder Shakespeare Centre Scholarship (or recommending it to a friend). This annual scholarship of £1,000 is awarded to ‘a worthy Shakespearian […]

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Shakespeare in our own words

On 11 July 2013 we hosted the showcase evening for a project we have been running since the autumn of 2012. 60 young people from 13 to 16  years old came to show off the poetry they had created re-telling Shakespeare’s tales in their own words. The “Shakespeare in Our Own Words” project was made […]

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Richard Council Window

Leicester’s Richard III

Living in Leicester has never been more exciting. Between people eager to see a car park, the influx of the international press conference, the portraits filling the windows of the City Council building, and the queues wrapping around the cathedral over the past two weeks, it is hard to ignore the atmosphere of delight and […]

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Michael Portillo with his copy of Bradshaw's Guide

Great British Railway Journeys Comes to Stratford-upon-Avon

It was a sunny and very busy September afternoon at the Shakespeare Birthplace. Heritage open weekend was underway, and visitors were making the most of the sunshine in the beautiful Birthplace garden. A rather conspicuous addition to the crowd was a film crew and, of course, Michael Portillo wearing a very striking cobalt blue jacket. […]

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Bearded Bard

Movember Bard

What better way is there to celebrate alongside Movember’s pogonophiles than by turning to the bearded bard himself? Shakespeare’s plays are full of references to beards; you can even purchase  Shakespeare’s facial hair in a fine packet of celebrated literary moustaches. Beards in Shakespeare’s day were more than a matter of fashion. In Rev. Thomas Firminger […]

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Download a free book written by Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells about Shakespeare, Conspiracy & Authorship. Download the Book.

DESTINATION SHAKESPEARE, THE DEBUT POETRY COLLECTION FROM LEADING SHAKESPEAREAN SCHOLAR PAUL EDMONDSON, IS OUT NOW!

24 brilliant poems, inspired by Shakespeare's life and art, bound in an artisan stitched chapbook

get your copy now