Tag Archives: Shakespeare
Professor Ewan Fernie, University of Birmingham

Freedom, Freetown and Fernie’s Fiery Feast

You do not expect a critic of Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard and other geniuses of human depth and intellect to be as good as Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky or Kierkegaard. Fair enough. But not when the critic’s name is Ewan Fernie. I had never before heard the author of what I consider to be one of […]

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Lester Othello

Keeping up with Shakespeare

When I started blogging on Shakespeare Calling a couple of years ago I had some kind of vague ambition – alongside of reading the plays and writing short responses to them – of seeing all the movies based on the plays, going to the theater to see the productions, reading the books about the plays… […]

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Shakespeare in our own words

On 11 July 2013 we hosted the showcase evening for a project we have been running since the autumn of 2012. 60 young people from 13 to 16  years old came to show off the poetry they had created re-telling Shakespeare’s tales in their own words. The “Shakespeare in Our Own Words” project was made […]

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Julia Margaret Cameron 'King Lear allotting his kingdom to his three daughters,' 1872. Cameron was an amateur photographer with connections in the Pre-Raphaelite art world; her images are largely motivated by prevailing notions of moral and aesthetic beauty. In this image, her husband Charles Hay Cameron poses as Lear, with the three daughters played by the Liddell sisters: Lorina, Edith and Lewis Carroll's muse, Alice.

Our Louis Marder Prize Winner

Shakespeare and Still Photography I am delighted to be awarded the Louis Marder Scholarship by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. My PhD research on ‘Shakespeare and Still Photography’ relies heavily on access to performance archives, and the scholarship will allow me take full advantage of the Shakespeare Centre Archive, particularly, its formidable collections of photographs dating […]

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Much Ado

“He cannot by the duello avoid it!”

Most of Shakespeare’s aristocratic patrons would be intimately familiar with the arts of swordplay. Furthermore, Shakespeare as a trained actor would have studied fighting accurately to replicate it onstage. This is why Shakespeare takes many opportunities to mention duelling culture in his plays, especially within the comedies.  Shakespeare uses duel references to comic effect in […]

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cover

Where is Shakespeare in the 21st Century?

The RSC’s  Such Tweet Sorrow, Comedy Central’s Fakespeare, and the meme blog Shakespeare Obsessed Sparrow: these are just a few of the manifestations of Shakespeare in the first decade of the 21st Century that viewers, listeners, tweeters, and surfers can experience. In our investigations to locate Shakespeare’s works and influence we encountered the outlandish, diverse, […]

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Richard Council Window

Leicester’s Richard III

Living in Leicester has never been more exciting. Between people eager to see a car park, the influx of the international press conference, the portraits filling the windows of the City Council building, and the queues wrapping around the cathedral over the past two weeks, it is hard to ignore the atmosphere of delight and […]

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‘How to Know if Someone Is in Love’: An Examination of Elizabethan Courtship in Much Ado About Nothing.

Like any other animal, human beings adopt a series of behaviours to show interest in mating in an appropriate way.  In the Elizabethan era, courtly love meant that a man strove to obtain his lady both through force of arms and through his skill in poetry. Benedick and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing despise […]

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Flying-dutchman

Shakespeare and The Flying Dutchman

Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure is a strongly political play, a work embedded in the complexities of social reality, but its hero/villain Angelo, whose admiration for Isabella’s ascetic purity morphs into sexual desire and a rape-attempt, is in part intensely spiritual. This is not, however, a spirituality that is allowed to unfold fully. István Géher brings […]

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