Tag Archives: Royal Shakespeare Company
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Coriolanus at the Royal Shakespeare Company

By Andrew Brown, Yale University Blog Post 2: Coriolanus at the Royal Shakespeare Company Andrew Brown is a Ph.D. student at Yale and was one of the recipients of a Sir Stanley Wells Shakespeare Studentship, via the American Friends of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. The award meant he could work in the archives and libraries in […]

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Bella Enahoro as Circe in The Odyssey, 1992. Photograph by Joe Cocks.

Ithaca in Stratford-upon-Avon: A Tribute to Sir Derek Walcott, Second Instalment of Blog Series

By Miranda Jones, Research Advocate, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust   Although the final script of Derek Walcott’s The Odyssey was published in 1993, a performance of the play has not been made widely available as a recording, and it is less well known today as it perhaps ought to be. As a result, when I […]

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Walcott

Ithaca in Stratford-upon-Avon: A Tribute to Sir Derek Walcott.

By Miranda Jones, Research Advocate, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust In 1991 the Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Adrian Noble, discussed the next potential project for the Stratford-upon-Avon stage with Gregory Doran. It was Doran’s first production with the company (of which he is now Artistic Director), and he wanted to produce a play […]

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salome

Salomé at the Swan

By Drs Sarah-Jane Fenton, Research Fellow, Mental Health & Wellbeing Unit, Warwick Medical School and Anjna Chouhan, Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.   A Shakespearian Watching Owen Horsley’s Salomé at the Swan was a remarkable experience for two reasons. First, the company was fizzing with a carnal, raw kind of energy that made my stomach churn […]

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Two US Army (USA) Military Police (MP) escort a detainee, dressed in his new orange jumpsuit to a cell at Camp X-Ray, Guantanamo Bay Navy Base, Cuba. Camp X-Ray is the holding facility for detainees held at the US Navy (USN) Base during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM.

“The time, the place, the torture”: the depiction of torture in Iqbal Khan’s Othello

“The time, the place, the torture”: the depiction of torture in Iqbal Khan’s Othello By Kelsey Ridge The 2015 Royal Shakespeare Company production of Othello directed by Iqbal Khan can readily be described as inspired by the War on Terror.  Actors wore khaki uniforms and carried guns, while an on-stage Messenger was replaced with satellite-video […]

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The Shakespeare Institute

Shakespeare is not dead

When the amazing news, covered on this blog, came through that the remains of Richard III had been found in a Leicester car park, I shouted it upstairs to my daughter before driving off to work.  She thought King Richard had been found alive.  I instantly imagined him in a fluorescent jacket, working for NCP, […]

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New Shakespeares

Two years ago I was approached by our colleagues and friends at The Shakespeare Institute: would The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust be interested in collaborating on a new MA Programme on Shakespeare and Creativity? I was more than interested. The idea resonated through years of my seeing and knowing that Shakespeare is a tremendous source of […]

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Julia Margaret Cameron 'King Lear allotting his kingdom to his three daughters,' 1872. Cameron was an amateur photographer with connections in the Pre-Raphaelite art world; her images are largely motivated by prevailing notions of moral and aesthetic beauty. In this image, her husband Charles Hay Cameron poses as Lear, with the three daughters played by the Liddell sisters: Lorina, Edith and Lewis Carroll's muse, Alice.

Our Louis Marder Prize Winner

Shakespeare and Still Photography I am delighted to be awarded the Louis Marder Scholarship by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. My PhD research on ‘Shakespeare and Still Photography’ relies heavily on access to performance archives, and the scholarship will allow me take full advantage of the Shakespeare Centre Archive, particularly, its formidable collections of photographs dating […]

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Ian Richardson as Bertram

The Plays We Overlook: All’s Well That Ends Well

Of the three “problem plays,” Troilus and Cressida and Measure for Measure, with their dark cynicism about sex and politics, seem finally to be coming into their own in our darkly cynical time. Not so All’s Well That Ends Well. All’s Well has been called the comic version of Coriolanus; if nothing else, these are […]

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Download a free book written by Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells about Shakespeare, Conspiracy & Authorship. Download the Book.

DESTINATION SHAKESPEARE, THE DEBUT POETRY COLLECTION FROM LEADING SHAKESPEAREAN SCHOLAR PAUL EDMONDSON, IS OUT NOW!

24 brilliant poems, inspired by Shakespeare's life and art, bound in an artisan stitched chapbook

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