Richard II (RSC) @ Royal Shakespeare Theatre and Barbican Centre, London, 2013-14History

  • Julie Raby
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Richard II directed by Gregory Doran for the Royal Shakespeare Company at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford Upon Avon and Barbican Centre, London, England (performances between October 27th 2013 and January 25th 2014).

A version of this blog was published on Between The Acts, Julieraby.com

Review by Julie Raby

RSC Richard II 2014

Oliver Rix’s Aumerle is a watcher, a waiverer and an outsider. He is often very emotional and conflicted. He is unsure where his loyalties should lie. He is his Father’s son (Duke of York brilliantly played by Oliver Ford Davies). Aumerle contrasts both with the broad brutish group that supports Bolingbroke and also with the more slender Flatterers (Bushy, Bagot and Greene) that follow Richard. Bolingbroke’s followers wear browns and rusts, whereas Richard’s followers wear greys and beiges. In contrast to these two factions, Aumerle wears a rich green cloak that is interwoven with metallic thread. His dress sets him apart from other characters. The director, Greg Doran, has talked in Q&A sessions about the way that David Tennant brings something of the contemporary to the production, and of course David Tenannt’s Richard is also a character who physically stands out from the other characters. Oliver Rix’s Aumerle also has a very contemporary feel.

What is very special about Rix’s performance is the way that he has built up the non-verbal action. His response to Richard’s Flatterers in the first act is one of disgust as they applaud Richard’s witticisms. There’s clearly a rivalry between Aumerle and Bushy (Sam Marks). This is particularly evident in their entrance to John of Gaunt’s house. As Bushy and Aumerle enter, Bushy turns to Aumerle and gives him a look of utter contempt and mouths something to him (2.1).

It’s not just Richard’s Flatterers that show disdain for Aumerle. Bolingbroke’s (Nigel Lindsay) burly followers don’t want Aumerle hanging around with them either. After the death of John of Gaunt it is clear that they want Aumerle to leave and he quickly gets the message (2.1).

In early scenes, Aumerle comforts his father. He helps him up when York is clearly upset at the death of his brother Gaunt, but this relationship quickly changes. After the scene on the gantry at Flint Castle, York moves to embrace Aumerle, who responds by grabbing his father’s cloak and gives the impression that he wants to throttle him. Both father and son swap sides. York shifts allegiances very quickly, but always reluctantly, from Richard to Bolingbroke, at the same time Aumerle’s allegiances move to Richard.

In conversations with colleagues we discussed that there were lots of hints in the production that suggested that Aumerle would become the murderer at the end.  For example, the Judas kiss on the battlements of Flint Castle was a clear hint. This production becomes a Who-will-do-it, as much as it is a Whodunit.

Aumerle is troubled when Richard banishes Bolingbroke and he embraces Bolingbroke before his banishment. Indeed, he supports Bolingbroke on his way to his banishment.  The sweet that Richard puts into Aumerle’s mouth silences him, as does the kiss on the gantry at Flint Castle (1.4 & 3.3). There are other places where Aumerle could speak and is silenced. At the very start of the performance, I am very unsure if Aumerle will also step forward and challenge Mowbray (Antony Byrne), but Richard’s entrance stops him doing so, and of course protocol does as well (1.1). During the ‘death of kings’ scene (3.2), I have seen Aumerle signal to Carlisle not to speak, and stays silent himself at certain points. Whilst Aumerle’s mother pleads for his life, he shows his annoyance at his father’s interventions through his gestures and facial expressions. Indeed, it is in his non-speaking moments that Aumerle is actually a very strong presence on stage. His expressions and gestures clearly convey his conflicted position and relationships with other characters.

In some performances, at Flint Castle, Bolingbroke looks directly at Aumerle as if questioning him and his loyalty. Just prior to this, Aumerle has just demonstrated his allegiance to Richard on the gantry, and the kiss and embrace between them can be read as a personal human moment, and the kiss can also be seen as a Judas kiss (3.3). Indeed, in the deposition scene as he says the lines, ‘In thy heart-blood, though being all too base. ‘ […] Did they not sometime cry, ‘All hail!’ to me? So Judas did to Christ […]’ (4.1.165), Richard directs the word Judas directly at Aumerle.

The use of mirrors is very important in Richard II. Greg Doran’s production cleverly sets up pieces of stage business that are mirrored later on in the performance. An obvious example of this is when Bagot (Jake Mann) brings Richard (David Tennant) the mirror it is to emphasise Richard’s vanity and his role as a Flatterer (1.4). Later in the deposition scene, it is Bagot who brings the mirror to Richard this time emphasising Richard’s fragility and demonstrating the transience of the support that Bagot had given Richard when he was King (4.1). Richard clearly recognises Bagot, and through the repetition of the earlier mirror moment, the betrayal is amplified. However, in both the mirror scenes, Aumerle is also an observer.

The image of the coffin on stage at the start of the performance is a wonderful precursor to the coffin dragged on stage by Aumerle at the end of the production. The production begins with a pre-show and the coffin of the Duke of Gloucester on stage. The Duchess of Gloucester (Jane Lapotaire) kneels weeping at the side of the coffin. One of the final images of the production is Richard’s coffin placed on the stage in the same spot where Gloucester’s coffin was and a kneeling Duke of York beside the coffin is reminiscent of the earlier pose taken at the start by the Duchess of Gloucester. This final image is overlaid by a strange image of the ghost of Richard, Christ-like in a white gown standing on the gantry. This image is a reminder of the white that Richard wore for his entrance at the start of the play. In the early scenes, Bolingbroke is banished and the production concludes with the banishment of Richard’s other cousin, Aumerle.

Further Details

http://www.rsc.org.uk/whats-on/richard-ii/

References

https://drjamirogers.wordpress.com/author/shakespearegoddess/

 

Photo: Oliver Rix as Aumerle which can be found here.

 

Julie Raby

Author: Julie Raby

Julie Raby is Head of Department: Humanities at York St John University. Her research interests include Shakespeare and contemporary performance, and she is working on a PhD at the Shakespeare Insitute. As well as teaching on the Shakespeare module, Julie has an interest in e-Learning and open space learning. Julie also blogs at julieraby.com.
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