“Do you hear, forester?”

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Ten Shakespearian conversation-openers with which to begin (or possibly sideline) a new relationship

“Did not I dance with you in Brabant once?

(‘Love’s Labour’s Lost’, 2.1.114)

“Sweet Saint, for charity be not so cursed”

(‘Richard III’, 1.2.49)

“What my dear Lady Disdain! Are yoo yet living?”

(‘Much Ado About Nothing’, 1.1.112)

“Say, what’s thy name?

Thou hast a grim appearance, and thy face

Bears a command in’t. Though thy tackle’s torn,

Thou show’st a noble vessel. What’s thy name?”

(‘Coriolanus’, 4.5.60-63)

“I pray you, what is’t o’clock?”

(‘As You Like It’, 3.2.293)

“You have bereft me of all words, lady”

(‘Troilus and Cressida’, 3.2.53)

“Good my lord,

How does your honour for this many a day?”

(‘Hamlet’, 3.1.93-4)

“Madam and mistress, a thousand good-morrows”

(‘The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 2.1.91)

“Good morrow, Kate, for that’s your name, I hear” **

(‘The Taming of the Shrew’, 2.1.182)

“If I profane with my unworthiest hand

This holy shrine, the gentler sin is this:

My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand

To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss”

(‘Romeo and Juliet’, 1.5.92-95)

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Author:Nick Walton

Nick Walton is a Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.
  • http://44calibreshakespeare.com Humphrey

    Haha just came from http://bloggingshakespeare.com/parting-is-such-sweet-sorrow so glad to get more of these

  • http://sorebuttcheeks.blogspot.com/ steroids

    where is Brabant ?

  • http://www.buybacklinkservices.com Backlinks

    My favorite is the one from Romeo and Juliet, “If I profane with my unworthiest hand
    This holy shrine, the gentler sin is this:
    My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
    To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss”
    Awesome thanks for posting these quotes.

  • Anonymous

    I really like, “You have bereft me of all words, lady.” Perhaps the word “bereft” might be replaced with something less foreign-sounding to the modern ear, like “robbed” or even “stripped,” if you think you can get away with it! Thanks for sharing these! LOL

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